This week we have a roundup of 10 interiors that give us fireplace envy, as well as a few tips from our experts on preventing damage this season

As the days grow noticeably shorter (and colder) in New England, gathering around a crackling fire becomes a much-welcomed way to spend an afternoon with a book or an evening with loved ones.

We’ve shared the following interiors that inspire true fireplace envy, as well as important tips from our experts on ensuring your fireplace experience is a safe one, for both you and your belongings.

 


 

A California Living Room by WRJ Design. Photo Courtesy of Audrey Hall for 1st Dibs

An interior designed by Michael Aiduss. Photography courtesy of George Ross for 1st Dibs

Studio Mellone designed Manhattan living room. Photography by William Abranowicz

Interiors by Michael del Piero. Photo Courtesy of Mesic Mackie for 1st Dibs

Interior Design by Cullman & Kravis. Photography by Eric Piasecki for 1st Dibs

Interiors by Chroma. Photography by Meghan K. Sadler and 1st Dibs

Interior Design by Barrie Benson Interior Design. Photo by Brie Williams

A 15th-century tower on an island off Croatia. Design by Rees Roberts & Partners. Photo by Scott Frances / OTTO

Interior Design by Huniford Design Studio. Photo by Stephen Kent Johnson

Interior Design and Photography by Ashley Hicks Courtesy of 1st Dibs


 

A Few Reminders from Our Team

  1. Be mindful of what you’re burning: not all woods are created equal. Burning pine wood emits resins which can cling to the lining of your chimney or porous surfaces, such as un-glazed porcelain or ceramics. Resins can also be harmful to the indoor air quality for you, your family and your pets.

 

  1. Structural Safety: old fireplaces are indeed beautiful and often historically charming, yet carry structural risks that come with age. If you have an older home, it is always a good idea to enlist the help of an expert to inspect the structural integrity of your chimney. Cracks in the mortar can leech smoke into walls, and loose bricks can come loose or collapse inwards.

 

  1. Preventative measures: Always use a fireplace screen. Risks of indoor fires, even flames from burning candles aren’t to be taken lightly. At Trefler’s, we’ve seen first-hand the potential damage that fire can cause. We encourage you to always use appropriate protective screens to ensure that no sparks fly where they aren’t intended. We also urge our clients to be mindful of placing rugs, or flammable objects close to any open flame.

 

  1. Protect what you showcase on your mantel: The mantel is, of course, a visually wonderful focal point to showcase antiques, decorative arts and framed family photos. If you will be enjoying fires this autumn and winter season, we encourage you to be mindful of their proximity to smoke emitted from fireplaces. Prolonged exposure can cause damage and soil paintings, porcelain and even metals. Be sure to properly frame photographs and paintings to prevent soot from accumulating on their surface. If you do have a painting hanging above a mantel without any protective glass on it, smoke exposure can darken surface varnish. Our experts can determine if an affected painting is in need of merely cleaning or restoration services, including re-varnishing. Examine it carefully in the light to see if lighter colors have darkened over time or yellowed. This could be a sign that soot has left its mark.

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