Beyond Contemporary: Looking to the Homes of Notable Interior Designers to See How Antiques Bring Much Needed Warmth to a Space

At Trefler’s, an appreciation for antiques is a given. Our primary passion lies in preserving and restoring items for our clients because we believe deeply in the value that living with antiques provides us. Whether stylistically ornate; such as an intricately constructed Venetian mirror, or more minimal, such as a Danish Mid-century Cabinet, these pieces will often always demonstrate an incredible level of craftsmanship and a quality of material that has enabled them to survive over time. 

On a more emotional level, antiques offer each of us a connection to our collective past. Regardless if an heirloom had belonged to a great grandmother, or was merely purchased at an estate sale, this small reminder of passing objects down from generation to generation evokes a sense of connection that we can all appreciate. 

In a recent conversation with local interior designer, Matthew Adams, this very subject of living with antiques naturally arose. Matthew, who recently launched his own firm MAD & Home, worked for over seven years under esteemed, local interior designer (and fellow champion of antiques), Charles Spada. Matthew, similarly, is a firm believer in the warmth that is achieved by sourcing furniture eclectically.

He described a particular situation in which clients had first attempted to furnish their new home seeking the help of a large, upmarket retailer. He remarked that after seeing plans drawn out by the retailer’s in-house designer, they were quickly dismayed by the prospect of their personal space being transformed into what resembled more of a showroom than a home.

And while this sense of warmth and history is just one benefit of using antiques and vintage furniture, there are undoubtedly others to consider; such as a lighter carbon footprint when compared with newly manufactured items, and often a far higher level of quality and craftsmanship accessible at a much lower price point. 

To investigate this theme further, we’ve shared the following personal homes of notable interior designers, proving that living with antiques can take so many different forms (and styles) while always creating a sense of place.  

 


 

Pierre Yovanovitch’s residence, Château de Fabrègues, in Provence

Photography by Jean-François Jaussaud for Surface Magazine

Charles Spada’s classically inspired residence in Normandy

The Drawing Room of Axel Vervoordt’s Castle of ‘s-Gravenwezel outside of Antwerp

Shawn Henderson’s Scandinavian inspired Weekend Home in Hillsdale, New York

Kevin Dumais’ study in his home in Litchfield, Connecticut

Images Courtesy of 1st Dibs

 

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